Articles tagged windows

  1. Scheduling Callbacks with WMI in C++


    I am going to be starting a series of posts on what I have learned on Windows pentesting and post exploitation. These posts will have a heavy focus on red teaming for competitions and cyber exercises. I am not a pentester, but I think some of the places to hide in Windows are cool so I want to write about them. These posts will include code snippets in powershell and C++. Much of this code I had to figure out how to write using the MSDN docs alone and feel that it is useful to put on the internet somewhere so others don't have to go through so much hassle to make it work.

    The topic of this post is scheduling persistent callbacks with Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI).

    WMI Explained (in brief)

    Essentially, WMI is an interface for configuration and information gathering on Windows systems. It is installed by default on Windows ME and up, which makes it a valuable resource for sysadmins and attackers. It contains information about all aspects of the system including processes, attached devices, and (I'm not kidding) games registered with Windows (wmic /namespace:\\root\cimv2\applications\games PATH game get). There is a lot of information here which will not be covered in this post. Exploration of what more WMI has to offer is left as an exercise to the reader!

    The interface consists of namespaces, classes, and instances of classes. Namespaces contain different classes and instances are instances of classes in a namespace. Think of a namespace as a database, a class as a table schema, and an instance as a row in that table. Instances can have properties and callable methods. One of the standard examples of method calling in WMI is creating a process with the WMI command line interface command wmic:

    wmic process call create calc.exe
    

    The above line will spawn calc.exe as the current user. ...


    Check out the full post for more details!